Most Resilient Indoor Plants (continued)
 

Easy house plants, low maintenance.

It's not easy to know which indoor plants are the most resilient.

Checking the resilience of a plant before you buy it will save you time. That's why I made a list of 14 indoor species that have successfully passed the resilience test (in my own flat and at other indoor gardeners' too). These are the easiest plants to grow and maintain on the long run because they can adapt to a wider range of conditions. Perfect for beginners and busy urban dwellers.

DRY SOIL vs MOIST SOIL

Plants no 1. to 7. prefer dry soil, so they can thrive on neglect. No 8. to 15. prefer having soil generally moist. 


8. Fruit Salad Plant

(A.K.A. MONSTERA deliciosa)

Monstera plants are easily recognized by their large green leaves filled with long holes.

Monstera plants are easily recognized by their large green leaves filled with long holes.

Plants from the Monstera family are really hardy species, they can adapt to a wide range of light and temperature conditions. Keep Monstera Deliciosa's soil generally moist, but it's totally alright to allow soil to dry out before watering again.


9. PRAYER PLANT

Easy and decorative, this  Maranta  is taken care of by lucky owner Vikram G. ( @theplantbureau  on instagram). Visit his page  here .

Easy and decorative, this Maranta is taken care of by lucky owner Vikram G. (@theplantbureau on instagram). Visit his page here.

Magical evergreens, prayer plants have enchanting moving foliage that closes at night and opens in the morning, performing a graceful dance every day. Keep soil generally moist, but it's totally alright to allow soil to dry out before watering again.


10. Arrowhead Plant

Arrowhead is one of Eliza Russell's  "favorite and most reliable plants" . Photo credit to Eliza Russell from Stamen & Stem on Instagram (see it  here )

Arrowhead is one of Eliza Russell's "favorite and most reliable plants". Photo credit to Eliza Russell from Stamen & Stem on Instagram (see it here)

According to Encyclopedia Britannica, arrowheads are perrenial herbs that grow in shallow lakes, ponds, and streams. No surprise you will have to keep soil generally moist, but it's totally alright to allow soil to dry out before watering again.


11. GOLDEN POTHOS

(a.k.a. Devil's Ivy)

Golden Pothos' flexible vines grow like no other

Golden Pothos' flexible vines grow like no other

Golden Pothos has been with me for 3 years now. It's my first indoor plant, and it seems to feel good about my weekly watering. It does not require a lot of light, so you can have it further away from the window, even in the shady corner of the room. It's very resilient, so if you forget to water it from time to time, you'll be easily forgiven. Allow soil to dry out completely between waterings.


12. SATIN POTHOS

Satin Pothos vines. Leaves curl when humidity is too low. Photo: InvincibleHousePlants.com

Satin Pothos vines. Leaves curl when humidity is too low. Photo: InvincibleHousePlants.com

Satin Pothos is just as easy to grow as its relative, Golden Pothos, which also made it to this list. The leaves are immediately recognizable, heart-shaped and spotted with silvery grey. Keep soil moist and humidity high, and pick a spot that's getting bright - but indirect - sunlight. That's the best way to look after it. If you deviate from these ideal conditions, it won't let you down either, since it's really resilient. The leaves will just start to curl, which would be a sign to increase moisture. I've had it for a year and it's growing at a steady pace.


13. Peace Lily

Easy-growing, vigorous tropical herbs, peace lilies are extremely easy to care for. They will do well even if you forget to water it every now and then. Allow soil to dry out between waterings.


14. Queen of Hearts

[Coming soon]


15. Swiss Cheese vine

(a.k.a. MONSTERA OBLIQUA)

Swiss Cheese vines, a.k.a  Monstera Obliqua , have the same characteristic holes as the Fruit Salad plant.

Swiss Cheese vines, a.k.a Monstera Obliqua, have the same characteristic holes as the Fruit Salad plant.

Like their cousin Monstera Deliciosa, the Swiss Cheese vines also like soil generally moist, but it's totally alright to allow soil to dry out before watering again.


Recap: in my experience, indoor plants can be categorized into 2 types: the Dry type and the Moist type. As a rule of thumb, you need to water the Moist types once a week and the Dry types only once a month. The ratio of 1-to-4 (4 times less frequently for the Dry type) works well for me, because it's easy to remember: weekly for Moist, monthly for Dry. These figures are just guidelines, you will have to adapt these to your specific conditions. You can use the same watering techniques for both. Cacti and succulents require a special type of soil that drains moisture out quickly. More on this topic: see here. [Coming Soon]


Thank you Jason! Inspiration for this article comes from a seasoned indoor gardener, Jason Chongue. You can find a description of his new book, Plant Societyhere.

I Hope you'll have a lot of success with these easy, yet beautiful, indoor plants. ENJOY!

 

If you want more tips for your plants and indoor jungle, subscribe to the newsletter below or follow me on social media. It will surely make my day!

Planti-fully yours,

xoxo

 

Urban Naturalist